Gradual Release of Responsibility: I do, We do, You do


Scaffolded instruction, or the gradual release model, is broadly recognized as a successful approach for moving classroom instruction from teacher-centered, wholegroup delivery to student-centered collaboration and independent practice. Sometimes referred to as “I do it, we do it, you do it,” this model proposes a plan of instruction that includes demonstration, prompt, and practice.

But as the student acquires the new information and skills, the responsibility of learning shifts from teacher-directed instruction to student processing activities. In the “We do” phase of learning, the teacher continues to model, question, prompt and cue students; but as student move into the “You do” phases, they rely more on themselves and less on the teacher to complete the learning task.

gradual release chartgradual release pyramid

Gradual Release Practices Detailed Description

Focus: ("I do it"):

Teacher

Teachers model their own metacognitive processes as active learners. Modeled strategies focus on increasing understanding of content-area text and information. Focus lessons establish a purpose for learning the material and increase the students understanding of the material to be mastered.

  • Provides direct instruction through lecture and demonstration
  • Establishes goals and purpose of the lesson
  • Models how to do the assignment
  • Think Aloud - talks through the process of solving the problem

 

Student

  • Actively listens
  • Takes notes
  • Asks for clarification

Assessment (High Yield Strategy)

  1. Thematic Instruction
  2. Identifying similarities and differences
  3. Summarizing and Note taking
  4. Reinforcing effort and recognition
  5. Homework and Practice
  6. Nonlinguistic representations
  7. Setting objectives
  8. Providing feedback
  9. Generating and Testing hypothesis
  10. Simulation and Games
  11. Cues, Questions, and Advance organizers

 

Guided Practice: ("We do it together")

Teacher

During guided instruction, teachers prompt, question, facilitate, or lead students through tasks that increase understanding of a particular assignment.

  • Coaching
  • Opportunities for Practice
  • Teacher Directed Q & A
  • Discussion - Checks, prompts, clues - The teacher scaffolds the students’ attempts and supports student thinking, giving feedback that honors both the child and the task during classroom discussions and conferring.
  • Interactive instruction - After explicitly modeling, the teacher gradually gives the students more responsibility for task completion
  • Works with students - The teacher and students practice the strategy together.
  • Provides additional modeling - the teacher models or demonstrates the activity again as needed.
  • Meets with needs-based groups - Students share their thinking processes with their peers during paired students and small and large group discussions.

 

Student

  • Asks and responds to questions
  • Works with teacher and classmates
  • Completes process alongside others

Assessment (High Yield Strategy)

  1. Thematic Instruction
  2. Identifying similarities and differences
  3. Summarizing and Note taking
  4. Reinforcing effort and recognition
  5. Homework and Practice
  6. Nonlinguistic representations
  7. Setting objectives
  8. Providing feedback
  9. Generating and Testing hypothesis
  10. Simulation and Games
  11. Cues, Questions, and Advance organizers

Collaborative: ("You do it with a partner/group")

Teacher

During the collaborative leraning component students consolidate their understanding of the content and explore opportunities to problem solve, discuss, negotiate, and think with their peers.

  • Moves among groups
  • Clarifies confusion
  • Provides support
  • Creates Learning Centers
  • Provides Hands-on Experience
  • Assigns groups (Think-Pair-Share, small groups)

 

Student

  • Works with classmates, shares outcome
  • Collaborates on authentic task
  • Consolidates learning
  • Completes process in small group
  • Looks to peers for clarification
  • Uses manipulatives, work areas
  • Students try to complete assigned tasks using kinetice and sensory skills that are directly applied
  • Students work with partners or in small groups to brainstorm, solve problems, and complete assigned tasks.

Assessment (High Yield Strategy)

  1. Thematic Instruction
  2. Identifying similarities and differences
  3. Summarizing and Note taking
  4. Reinforcing effort and recognition
  5. Homework and Practice
  6. Nonlinguistic representations
  7. Setting objectives
  8. Providing feedback
  9. Generating and Testing hypothesis
  10. Simulation and Games
  11. Cues, Questions, and Advance organizers

Independent ("You do it alone")

Teacher

During independent learning students practice applying skills and information in new ways. As students trasfer their learning to subsequent tasks, they synthesize information, transform ideas, and solidify their understanding.

  • Provides feedback - The students continue to receive regular feedback from the teacher and other students.
  • Evaluates - Determines level of understanding through testing, assessment/UPA, or student presentation

Student

  • Works alone
  • Relies on notes, activities, classroom
    learning to complete assignment
  • Takes full responsibility for outcome
  • Demonstrates knowledge through testing, assessment/UPA, or student presentation
  • During independent learning students practice applying skills and information in new ways. As students trasfer their learning to subsequent tasks, they synthesize information, transform ideas, and solidify their understanding.

Assessment (High Yield Strategy)

  1. Thematic Instruction
  2. Identifying similarities and differences
  3. Summarizing and Note taking
  4. Reinforcing effort and recognition
  5. Homework and Practice
  6. Nonlinguistic representations
  7. Setting objectives
  8. Providing feedback
  9. Generating and Testing hypothesis
  10. Simulation and Games
  11. Cues, Questions, and Advance organizers

 

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